Wednesday, February 29, 2012

So long, farewell...

So long, farewell
Auf Wiedersehen, adieu
Adieu, adieu
To you and you and you...


And in case you don't recognise it...it's from The Sound of Music.

I have decided to close my blog.   I may come back at another time...in another place, but for now it's goodbye!

Thankyou to those who visited me here and left comments over the last 12 months.

I'm tying up loose ends as I hope to be moving soon, but once I get resettled I might start blogging again.

I like to write and receive letters, so if any of you would like to write (I prefer snail mail, but also do email) leave your details in a comment (I won't publish the comment with your details).

I will close my blog this Sunday.

Thanks for your company.....  :o)

Monday, February 13, 2012

Annual Mennonite Conference in Tasmania

This past weekend I attended the Annual Mennonite Conference in Deloraine, Tasmania. I had not been in a Mennonite congregation before, but it was a wonderful time of good sermons, heavenly singing, delightful fellowship and delicious food!

Most of the folk were from the US and Canada, with just a few of us Aussies. The conservative Mennonite church is quite new to Australia with most people here not knowing who/what they are, although most do know of the Amish if you mention them.

They are getting a church started up in Deloraine, due in a large part to the work of Joseph and Carolynn van Loon (who I stayed with).

Their website is here, and there is lots of info and great sermons to listen to if you are interested.

Below are some photos I took at the Sunday fellowship lunch. There were about 60 folk there...

If you want to see the photos bigger...just click on them.



Saturday, February 4, 2012

the dangers of microwaving water

This info was posted on a Yahoo group I belong to.  I'm sharing it here because I didn't know this could happen...maybe you didn't either:

Microwaved Water
> This is something many of us did not know........!
> Microwaving Water!
>
> A 26-year old man decided to have a cup of coffee. He took a cup of water and put it in the microwave to heat it up (something that he had done numerous times before). I am not sure how long he set the timer for, but he wanted to bring the water to a boil. When the timer shut the oven off, he removed the cup from the oven. As he looked into the cup, he noted that the water was not boiling, but suddenly the water in the cup 'blew up' into his face. The cup remained intact until he threw it out of his hand, but all the water had flown out into his face due to the build-up of energy. His whole face is blistered and he has 1st and 2nd degree burns to his face which may leave scarring.
>
> He also may have lost partial sight in his left eye. While at the hospital, the doctor who was attending to him stated that this is a fairly common occurrence and water (alone) should never be heated in a microwave oven. If water is heated in this manner, something should be placed in the cup to diffuse the energy such as a wooden stir stick, tea bag, etc, (nothing metal).
>
> General Electric's Response:
>
> Thanks for contacting us; I will be happy to assist you. The e-mail that you received is correct. Microwaved water and other liquids do not always bubble when they reach boiling point. They can actually get superheated and not bubble at all. The superheated liquid will bubble up out of the cup when it is moved or when something like a spoon or tea bag is put into it.
>
> To prevent this from happening and causing injury, do not heat any liquid for more than two minutes per cup. After heating, let the cup stand in the microwave forthirty seconds before moving it or adding anything into it.
>
> Here is what a local high school science teacher had to say on the matter: 'Thanks for the microwave warning. I have seen this happen before. It is caused by a phenomenon known as super heating. It can occur any time water is heated and will particularly occur if the vessel that the water is heated in is new, or when heating a small amount of water (less than half a cup).
>
> What happens is that the water heats faster than the vapour bubbles can form. If the cup is very new, then it is unlikely to have small surface scratches inside it that provide a place for the bubbles to form. As the bubbles cannot form and release some of the heat that has built up, the liquid does not boil, and the liquid continues to heat up well past its boiling point.
>
> What then usually happens is that the liquid is bumped or jarred, which is just enough of a
> shock to cause the bubbles to rapidly form and expel the hot liquid. The rapid formation of bubbles is also why a carbonated beveragespews when opened after having been shaken.'
>

Sunday Hymn - O Love That Wilt Not Let Me Go

O Love that wilt not let me go,
I rest my weary soul in thee;
I give thee back the life I owe,
That in thine ocean depths its flow
May richer, fuller be.

O light that followest all my way,
I yield my flickering torch to thee;
My heart restores its borrowed ray,
That in thy sunshine’s blaze its day
May brighter, fairer be.

O Joy that seekest me through pain,
I cannot close my heart to thee;
I trace the rainbow through the rain,
And feel the promise is not vain,
That morn shall tearless be.

O Cross that liftest up my head,
I dare not ask to fly from thee;
I lay in dust life’s glory dead,
And from the ground there blossoms red
Life that shall endless be.

Words by George Matheson.

Born: March 27, 1842, Glas­gow, Scot­land.
Died: Au­gust 28, 1906, Aven­ell House, North Ber­wick, Ed­in­burgh, Scot­land.
Born with poor vi­sion, Ma­the­son’s eye­sight grad­ual­ly wors­ened un­til he was al­most to­tal­ly blind. How­ev­er, he was aca­dem­ic­al­ly gift­ed, and his sis­ters learned La­tin, Greek, and He­brew to help him stu­dy. He grad­u­at­ed from the Un­i­ver­si­ty of Edin­burgh (MA 1862), then be­came a min­is­ter in the Church of Scot­land. He pa­stored in the re­sort town of In­ne­lan for 18 years; due to his abil­i­ty to mem­o­rize serm­ons and en­tire sec­tions of the Bi­ble, lis­ten­ers were of­ten un­a­ware he was blind. In 1886, Matheson be­came pas­tor of St. Ber­nard’s Church in Edin­burgh, where he served 13 years. He spent the re­main­ing years of his life in lit­er­ary ef­forts.

Matheson said about this hymn:
My hymn was com­posed in the manse of In­ne­lan [Ar­gyle­shire, Scot­land] on the ev­en­ing of the 6th of June, 1882, when I was 40 years of age. I was alone in the manse at that time. It was the night of my sister’s mar­ri­age, and the rest of the fam­i­ly were stay­ing over­night in Glas­gow. Some­thing hap­pened to me, which was known only to my­self, and which caused me the most se­vere men­tal suf­fer­ing. The hymn was the fruit of that suf­fer­ing. It was the quick­est bit of work I ever did in my life. I had the im­press­ion of hav­ing it dic­tat­ed to me by some in­ward voice ra­ther than of work­ing it out my­self. I am quite sure that the whole work was com­plet­ed in five min­utes, and equal­ly sure that it ne­ver re­ceived at my hands any re­touch­ing or cor­rect­ion. I have no na­tur­al gift of rhy­thm. All the other vers­es I have ever writ­ten are man­u­fact­ured ar­ti­cles; this came like a day­spring from on high.